Cherry Berry Trifle: Holiday Dessert in a Jar

Video from Whip and Click:

We are pastry chef Albane Sharrard (whip) and food photographer Evi Abeler (click). We combined our pastry and photo skills and founded “whip + click” to bring you seasonal treats. In this video we show you how to make a Cherry Berry Trifle in a Jar.


Here is the recipe:

  • blueberries
  • raspberries
  • cherries
  • ladyfingers, broken into pieces
  • 1 cup softened mascarpone cheese
  • ½ cup heavy cream
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla

Pour mascarpone cheese, heavy cream, sugar and vanilla into a bowl and whisk until you get soft peaks. Start by placing a few pieces of ladyfingers in the bottom of each jar. Working in thin layers, add: cream, raspberries, ladyfingers, cream, blueberries, ladyfingers, cream and cherries on top. This recipe makes enough for four 8 ounce jars.


Visit Evi Abeler website: eviabeler.com
Vist Whip & Click blog: whipandclick.com
Instagram: @eviabeler
Twitter: @eviabeler

About Harvest, LLC shares stories about food and agriculture. Subscribe to receive stories about the science, history and relevance of agricultural crops grown and harvested around the world.

Feedweb for WordPress. v3.0.8

Einkorn – the million year old grain

“All the wheats we have today, and all the farro’s go back to this plant..”

Video from ChefShop.com

Rene Featherstone has worked in agriculture all his life, including agricultural journalism. He is an expert in ancient and modern wheat and other exotic grains. Most recently, his passion for knowledge has taken him backwards in time to grow an ancient grain called Einkorn. Grown in Germany and many other parts of the world, This may be the first field of Einkorn grown in the US.

For more about the ancient heritage grains grown by Rene Featherstone visit: lentzspelt.com

Follow Chefshop on twitter: @ChefShop and visit their website at: Chefshop.com

About Harvest, LLC shares stories about food and agriculture. Subscribe to receive stories about the science, history and relevance of agricultural crops grown and harvested around the world.

Feedweb for WordPress. v3.0.8

Why do we need fish passage?

Video from NOAA Fisheries

To learn more about NOAA Fisheries, visit: fisheries.noaa.gov

Follow NOAA on twitter: @NOAAFisheries

About Harvest, LLC shares stories about food and agriculture. Subscribe to receive stories about the science, history and relevance of agricultural crops grown and harvested around the world.

Feedweb for WordPress. v3.0.8

Terroir: A Sustainable Restaurant

It means earth or dirt in French

From Cooking Up a Story:

Stu Stein, owner of Terroir shares his philosophy and vision for his then newly created restaurant.

For recipes and to learn more about Cooking Up a Story visit: cookingupastory.com

Follow them on twitter: @cookingupastory

About Harvest, LLC shares stories about food and agriculture. Subscribe to receive stories about the science, history and relevance of agricultural crops grown and harvested around the world.

Feedweb for WordPress. v3.0.8

Latinos in Agriculture Leader Profile | Vanessa Martinez

LIAlogo_lg


Interview with Latino in Agriculture Leader
Vanessa Gabriella Martinez, Student
 


Vanessa Gabriella Martinez 3

“I wanted to build a career where I could help the environment feed people”


 

AH: How did you get into food and agriculture and what are your professional aspirations?

VM:My exposure to agriculture is very non-traditional. I originally started off as a kinesiology major with an interest in physical therapy until I volunteered at the Rio Grande Community Farm for credit in a Biology course. It was there that I was exposed to an urban agriculture operation that was sustainable for both the community and the ecological environment. I realized that these concepts were important to me and that I wanted to build a career where I could help the environment feed people. Upon the completion of my degree I will have a Bachelors in Agricultural Science and Community development, therefore I want to merge this with my interest in nutrition in hopes of improving our food web in its relation to health, food security, and environment.

 

Vanessa Gabriella Martinez 4

“I started with the US Forest Service in a student temporary employment position.”

 


 

AH:You have worked the last four summers with the USDA,what did your work entail?

VM:I started with the United States Forest Service in a student temporary employment position (STEP) as a trail crew member with the Heber-Kamas ranger district. My main duties were hiking and maintenance of trail, however the internal value was that it built a work ethic that can only be achieved hiking 4+ miles daily, crosscutting dead trees, removing waterlogged stumps, and spiking out during the monsoon season. I currently hold a position with the Natural Resource Conservation Service as a Pathways intern. This position is intended to give the student the opportunity to gain field experience for 2 summers before graduating into a fulltime position with the selected agency. My specific position was with NRCS-TX, and I was able to work in zone 1&3, where I learned the technical side of large-scale agriculture and how NRCS helps farmers and landowners preserve the productivity of the land.

 

Vanessa Gabriella Martinez


AH:What are some of the ways your mentors, teachers and superiors have helped guide you?

VM:If it wasn’t for my mentors, I can honestly say I would not be where I am today. Dr. Martha Desmond who is the coordinator for my program, Natural Resource Career Tracks, has been there from the very start of my academic career to the finish. She was the first person I contacted when I transferred from my community college. I took my first Natural Resource course with her and I remember her always calling me out to answer in class, which at first I did not like, but I now realize it’s because she saw something in me that I didn’t. Even though I switched programs, she still continued to follow up with me every semester to make sure that I was on track with my courses, summer internship, and GPA. My advisor for the past 2 years, Dr. Brenda Seevers has been a strong mentor and teacher for me; I’ve appreciated the international culture that she exposed us to through her classes, which have invigorated me to explore the many faces of agriculture and development. Other mentors have been past supervisors of mine, in every agency I’ve worked, USFS, NRCS, NM-state parks, I’ve always been fortunate to work under a strong leadership. They have all helped guide me in a unique individual way, and I hope to carry on each of their legacies in my own unique way.

 

Vanessa Gabriella Martinez

AH: What did you think of the 2014 Latinos in Agriculture Leaders Conference?

VM:My experience at the 2014 Latinos in Agriculture Leaders Conference was invigorating. At my level in college, it was encouraging to hear the start and success stories of people whom were once in the position I am. It also challenged me to confront my fears of public speaking and compose myself in a professional image.

AH:Has the Latinos in Agriculture Leaders Conference helped you?

VM:Latinos in Agriculture Leaders Conference is helping me professionally because it has given me the opportunity to bring to attention what I believe is important in agriculture. It has also given me the opportunity to expose the people and organizations along the way that deserve attention as well.

New Mexico-Natural Resource Career Tracks Program visit: facebook.com/nrct.nmsu

To learn more about Latinos in Agriculture visit: latinosinagriculture.com

Follow on Twitter: @LatinosInAg

About Harvest, LLC shares stories about food and agriculture. Subscribe to receive stories about the science, history and relevance of agricultural crops grown and harvested around the world.

Feedweb for WordPress. v3.0.8

A Craftsman

“…Not every hard working farmer gets to be successful.”

Video created by theperennialplate.com in partnership with intrepidtravel.com/food

Our last film from our real food world tour takes us to a family farm in Northern Ethiopia where they grow mostly Teff – the grain used to make Injera. We thought it fitting to end on a story about subsistence and the happiness that comes from having enough.

Filmed & edited by:
Daniel Klein: twitter.com/perennialplate
Mirra Fine: twitter.com/kaleandcola
Music by: oskarschuster.com

About Harvest, LLC shares stories about food and agriculture. Subscribe to receive stories about the science, history and relevance of agricultural crops grown and harvested around the world.

Feedweb for WordPress. v3.0.8

“Everyone shopped at a 5 & dime, everyone could afford it…”

Counter Histories: Jackson, Mississippi

Film courtesy of the Southern Foodways Alliance at the University of Mississippi.

For more SFA films, visit www.southernfoodways.org.

Follow them on Twitter: @potlikker

About Harvest, LLC shares stories about food and agriculture. Subscribe to receive stories about the science, history and relevance of agricultural crops grown and harvested around the world.

Feedweb for WordPress. v3.0.8

Pumpkin Caramel Oatmeal Squares Recipe

Nothing says fall like Pumpkin

Video from Le Gourmet TV, to learn more visit at: legourmet.tv

Follow Le Gourmet TV on twitter: @LeGourmetTV

About Harvest, LLC shares stories about food and agriculture. Subscribe to receive stories about the science, history and relevance of agricultural crops grown and harvested around the world.

Feedweb for WordPress. v3.0.8

Urban Farm expansion hampered by regulations

Video by Daniel Wientraub and Carl Costas from California Health Report TV:

In this story we go to the Yisrael Family Farm in Sacramento where former tech worker Chanowk Yisrael is trying to support his family through a backyard farm in the heart of one of urban Sacramento’s grittiest neighborhoods.

To learn more visit healthycal.org

Follow on twitter: @healthreportCA

About Harvest, LLC shares stories about food and agriculture. Subscribe to receive stories about the science, history and relevance of agricultural crops grown and harvested around the world.

Feedweb for WordPress. v3.0.8

Farming in America’s Breadbasket: A Paradigm Shift

Video from Great Lakes Protection Fund:

A team of Great Lakes leaders is working to improve water quality across the Great Lakes region. To do so, they are reshaping the farming paradigm in the region to integrate water quality goals and environmental outcomes into the design and evaluation of conservation practices. A shift in the paradigm also means the inclusion of the entire agricultural supply chain in setting and reaching water quality standards. Financing by the Great Lakes Protection Fund has made these innovations possible.

The mission of the Great Lakes Protection is to “identify, demonstrate, and promote regional action to enhance the health of the Great Lakes ecosystem.”

To learn more about Great Lakes Protection Fund visit: glpf.org
GLPF on Twitter: @GLPFund

TNC Michigan on Twitter: @nature_MI

About Harvest, LLC shares stories about food and agriculture. Subscribe to receive stories about the science, history and relevance of agricultural crops grown and harvested around the world.

Feedweb for WordPress. v3.0.8